mariebesnob:

Hunter S. Thompson photographed March 12, 1974 on the beach of Cozumel, Mexico by Al Satterwhite.

(via hipqies)

Timestamp: 1398049881

Our current enigmatic relationship

My favorite poet once wrote that loving someone who doesn’t give a damn about you isn’t sexy; it’s misplaced energy. 

You are a complete manifestation of my misplaced energy. The love I pour into your soul leaves mine feeling empty. You control the power switch to the unreciprocated energy that runs through my body; It is caught in a closed circuit and you are the release valve that won’t open. 

I know you see how I tear at my skin trying to release that energy from my veins, put it to something more useful than trying to make you feel something more for me. You are deep rooted like the redwoods to the Earth. There is no way I can seem to cut you out of me. 

Our souls seem to work like magnets, trying to stay stuck together when what I know i need is solitude. You are therapeutic to my will to stay the same, but to be able to move on you must leave something behind to keep things in balance. And I cannot move forward when you want me to stay here, only as your friend. I cannot only love you as a friend. And it is damaging to know that it’s her you fall asleep next to. It’s even harder knowing tht I cannot push anger towards you, for you have done nothing wrong.

Unrequited love is not a choice, for either party. But that doesn’t make it any less excruciating when your alone in bed knowing that’s what you truly are. 

For now I don’t have the strength or will power to pull myself out of you. But you are a distraction, and a false hope. One that I cannot afford to put much more energy into. Soon I will have to let this relationship fade out into the abyss. Ill have to let you be so that I can be.

"And it’s hard to hate someone once you understand them."

Lucy Christopher, Stolen: A Letter to My Captor (via perfect)

(Source: quotes-shape-us, via gnostic-forest)

chroniclesofamber:

Cyber-Dys-Punk-Topia

“There was a place near an airport, Kowloon, when Hong Kong wasn’t China, but there had been a mistake, a long time ago, and that place, very small, many people, it still belonged to China. So there was no law there. An outlaw place. And more and more people crowded in; they built it up, higher. No rules, just building, just people living. Police wouldn’t go there. Drugs and whores and gambling. But people living, too. Factories, restaurants. A city. No laws.

William Gibson, Idoru

It was the most densely populated place on Earth for most of the 20th century, where a room cost the equivalent of US$6 per month in high rise buildings that belonged to no country. In this urban enclave, “a historical accident”, law had no place. Drug dealers, pimps and prostitutes lived and worked alongside kindergartens, and residents walked the narrow alleys with umbrellas to shield themselves from the endless, constant dripping of makeshift water pipes above….

Kowloon ‘Walled’ City lost its wall during the Second World War when Japan invaded and razed the walls for materials to expand the nearby airport. When Japan surrendered, claims of sovereignty over Kowloon finally came to a head between the Chinese and the British. Perhaps to avoid triggering yet another conflict in the wake of a world war, both countries wiped their hands of the burgeoning territory.

And then came the refugees, the squatters, the outlaws. The uncontrolled building of 300 interconnected towers crammed into a seven-acre plot of land had begun and by 1990, Kowloon was home to more than 50,000 inhabitants….

Despite earning its Cantonese nickname, “City of Darkness”, amazingly, many of Kowloon’s residents liked living there. And even with its lack of basic amenities such as sanitation, safety and even sunlight, it’s reported that many have fond memories of the friendly tight-knit community that was “poor but happy”.

“People who lived there were always loyal to each other. In the Walled City, the sunshine always followed the rain,” a former resident told the South China Morning Post….

Today all that remains of Kowloon is a bronze small-scale model of the labyrinth in the middle a public park where it once stood.

This isn’t to say places like Kowloon Walled City no longer exist in Hong Kong….

— from Anywhere But Here: Kowloon “Anarchy” City

(via fscottbukowski)

Timestamp: 1397687160